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By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
July 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
CharlizeTheronBackinActionAfterDentalSurgery

When they’re introducing a new movie, actors often take a moment to pay tribute to the people who helped make it happen — like, you know, their dentists. At least that’s what Charlize Theron did at the premiere of her new spy thriller, Atomic Blonde.

"I just want to take a quick moment to thank my dentists," she told a Los Angeles audience as they waited for the film to roll. "I don’t even know if they’re here, but I just want to say thank you."

Why did the starring actress/producer give a shout-out to her dental team? It seems she trained and fought so hard in the action sequences that she actually cracked two teeth!

“I had severe tooth pain, which I never had in my entire life,” Theron told an interviewer from Variety. At first, she thought it was a cavity — but later, she found out it was more serious: One tooth needed a root canal, and the other had to be extracted and replaced with a dental implant — but first, a bone grafting procedure was needed. “I had to put a donor bone in [the jaw] to heal,” she noted, “and then I had another surgery to put a metal screw in there.”

Although it might sound like the kind of treatment only an action hero would need, bone grafting is now a routine part of many dental implant procedures. The reason is that without a sufficient volume of good-quality bone, implant placement is difficult or impossible. That’s because the screw-like implant must be firmly joined with the jawbone, so it can support the replacement tooth.

Fortunately, dentists have a way to help your body build new bone: A relatively small amount of bone material can be placed in the missing tooth’s socket in a procedure called bone grafting. This may come from your own body or, more likely, it may be processed bone material from a laboratory. The donor material can be from a human, animal or synthetic source, but because of stringent processing techniques, the material is safe for human use. Once it is put in place your body takes over, using the grafted material as a scaffold on which to build new bone cells. If jawbone volume is insufficient for implants, it can often be restored to a viable point in a few months.

Better yet, when grafting material is placed in the tooth socket immediately after extraction, it can keep most of the bone loss from occurring in the first place, enabling an implant to be placed as soon as possible — even before the end of a movie’s shooting schedule.

Will Atomic Blonde prove to be an action-movie classic? Only time will tell. But one thing’s for sure: When Charlize Theron walks down the red carpet, she won’t have to worry about a gap in her smile.

If you have questions about bone grafting or dental implants, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Immediate Dental Implant.”

By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
May 14, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth pain  
OnlyaDentalExamcanIdentifytheRootCauseofYourToothPain

A toothache means you have tooth decay, right? Not necessarily — your pain could be signaling a number of potential causes. Determining where, how much and how often it hurts will help us find out the cause and apply the appropriate treatment.

A single symptom, for example, can mean many things. A twinge of tooth pain as you consume hot or cold foods might indicate localized tooth decay easily repaired by a filling. But it could also mean the tooth's root surface has been exposed as a result of periodontal (gum) disease — aggressive plaque removal and maybe even gum surgery might be necessary. Or it could be a sign of inner pulp decay: in this case you'll likely need a root canal treatment to save the tooth.

Pulp decay can also announce itself with a very sharp and constant pain radiating from one or more teeth. You shouldn't hesitate to see us for an examination — even if the pain goes away. Pain cessation most likely means the nerves in the pulp have died. The infection, however, still exists, so you'll still probably need a root canal treatment.

If you notice severe, continuous pain and pressure around a tooth, particularly about the gums, you may have a localized, inflamed area of infection called an abscess. An abscess can be the result of gum disease, but it might also stem from a foreign body like a popcorn husk, getting stuck below the gums. We'll need to conduct a complete dental examination to determine the cause and how to treat it.

Finally, a sharp pain when you bite down could mean many things such as a loose filling or a fractured (cracked) tooth. The latter especially requires immediate attention to save the tooth.

These are just a few of the possible causes behind mouth or facial pain. Although all of them are serious, a few are true dental emergencies and can't wait if we're going to save a tooth. The sooner you see us, the sooner we can help relieve the pain, minimize any damage and avert disaster.

If you would like more information on treating tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!

By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
June 02, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache   tooth pain  
ToothPainDuringPressureChangesCouldBeWarningofaBiggerProblem

People who fly or scuba dive know firsthand how changes in atmospheric pressure can affect the body: as minor as a popping in the ears, or as life-threatening as decompression sickness. Pressure changes can also cause pain and discomfort in your teeth and sinuses — in fact, severe pain could be a sign of a bigger problem.

Barotrauma (baro – “pressure;” trauma – “injury”), also known as a “squeeze,” occurs when the unequal air pressures outside and inside the body attempt to equalize. Many of the body's organs and structures are filled with air within rigid walls; the force created by equalization presses against these walls and associated nerves, which in turn causes the pain.

The sinus cavities and the middle ear spaces are especially sensitive. Each of these has small openings that help with pressure equalization. However, they can become swollen or blocked with mucous (as when you have a head cold), which slows equalization and contributes to the pain.

It's also possible to experience tooth pain during pressure change. This is because the back teeth in the upper jaw share the same nerve pathways as the upper jaw sinuses — pain originating from the sinuses can be felt in the teeth, and vice-versa. In fact, it's because of this shared pathway that pressure changes can amplify pain from a tooth with a deeper problem, such as a crack, fracture or a defect in dental work.

Besides problems with your teeth, the severe pain could also be related to temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction (TMD), which is pain or discomfort in the small joint that connects your lower jaw to your skull. There are a number of causes for this, but a common one for scuba divers is an ill-fitted regulator mouthpiece that they are biting down on too hard while diving. A custom-fitted mouthpiece could help alleviate the problem.

If you've been experiencing tooth pain during pressure change events, you should see us for an examination before you fly or dive again. There might be more to your pain — and correcting these underlying problems could save you extreme discomfort in the future.

If you would like more information on the effects of atmospheric pressure changes on teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Pressure Changes Can Cause Tooth & Sinus Pain.”

By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
July 05, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache   tooth pain  
TestingyourKnowledgeonToothPain

When it comes to tooth pain, it is important to identify two things: what is causing your pain and what can be done about it. In some instances you can handle it yourself at home; however, for others, you should contact us so that we can diagnose and treat the problem. See how much you really know about tooth pain by taking our true/false test.

  1. It is perfectly normal to experience tooth sensitivity to hot and cold foods for a few days after dental treatment.
    True or False
  2. If you experience sharp pain when biting down on foods, you should hold off on contacting us to see if the pain gets better on it own.
    True or False
  3. Tooth pain is caused by a reaction of nerves inside the tooth's enamel with the severity of the pain dependant upon the type and degree of the stimulus.
    True or False
  4. Generally speaking, pain is a protective response that ranges from minor to severe as a way of informing the body that something is wrong.
    True or False
  5. If a tooth's root surface is sensitive, you should use a firm toothbrush to ensure that you are keeping the area clean by thoroughly removing dental bacterial plaque.
    True or False
  6. Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods and liquids probably means that the pulp within your tooth is probably damaged or inflamed as a result of deep tooth decay or injury from a physical trauma.
    True or False
  7. Regarding tooth sensitivity, you should only contact us if the pain persists for several months because this is not likely to be anything serious.
    True or False
  8. If a tooth's pulp becomes damaged or dies, you will need a root canal.
    True or False
  9. With tooth pain, knowing how long to wait before you contact us can save physical, financial and emotional stress.
    True or False
  10. People often confuse tooth and sinus pain because they both can feel the same — a dull ache with pressure in the upper teeth and sinus area on one or both sides of the face.
    True or False

Answers: 1) True. 2) False. You should contact us asap for an examination before the pain worsens. 3) False. The nerves are located in the tooth's pulp chamber. 4) True. 5) False. Use a soft bristled toothbrush not a firm one. 6) True. 7) False. While tooth sensitivity generally does not signal a serious issue, if it persist for days or worsens, contact us. 8) True. 9) False. Early interception is best. 10) True.

To learn more, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!” Or contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions.