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Posts for: August, 2014

By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
August 29, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
ProtectYourVeneersWithaFewCommonSensePrecautions

Porcelain veneers are a proven way to achieve a new smile. Composed of thin layers of dental porcelain and other materials laminated together to form one life-like unit, veneers are applied to the outside of a prepared natural tooth to enhance its appearance. Given the right circumstances, they’re an excellent solution for correcting mild to moderate spaces between teeth, slight deviations in tooth position, and problems with the color and shape of a tooth.

Veneers are very strong and can resist most of the forces you generate when you chew your food. But dental porcelain is also a form of glass — strong but not indestructible. Following a few maintenance guidelines will help you avoid damaging a porcelain veneer and incurring additional dental care costs.

Practice daily oral hygiene. Although veneers aren’t subject to disease or decay, the tooth structure they cover and the surrounding gum tissues are. You should, therefore, brush and floss veneered teeth just as you would any other tooth. And, there’s no need for specially formulated toothpastes — any non-abrasive fluoride brand will work.

Avoid excessive biting or chewing. While it’s a good practice for natural teeth to avoid applying too much biting force to hard materials, it’s especially important for veneers. Attempting to open hard-shell nuts with your teeth or chewing on bones, pencils and other hard objects are just a few of the activities that could lead to a shattered veneer.

Use a bite guard for clenching habits. People who excessively grind or clench their teeth (a condition called bruxism) can also put undue stress on their veneers. We can help alleviate some of this stress by fashioning a bite guard you wear at night. The guard will help protect your veneers from teeth grinding while you sleep.

Limit foods and drinks that cause staining. Tea, coffee, wine and similar substances can leave teeth stained and dingy. Although your new veneers won’t typically stain, the natural teeth around them can — the brighter veneers would then stand out prominently from the dingier natural teeth.

Porcelain veneers are proven “smile changers.” Taking care of them with a few common sense precautions will ensure the change is long-lasting.

If you would like more information on porcelain veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smile Design Enhanced With Porcelain Veneers.”


By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
August 13, 2014
Category: Oral Health
WhatWontFlorenceHendersonLeaveHomeWithout

She's an international star who's recognized everywhere she goes. As Carol Brady, she was an ambassador for the “blended family” before most of us even knew what to call her bunch. And her TV Land Pop Culture Icon Award is on permanent display in the National Museum of American History. So what item that fits inside a purse can't Florence Henderson do without?

“I will never leave home without dental floss!” she recently told an interviewer with Dear Doctor magazine. “Because I have such a wide smile, I have found spinach or black pepper between my teeth after smiling very broadly and confidently.”

Henderson clearly understands the importance of good oral hygiene — and she's still got her own teeth to back it up! In fact, flossing is the best method for removing plaque from between the teeth, especially in the areas where a brush won't reach. Yet, while most people brush their teeth regularly, far fewer take the time to floss. Is there any way to make flossing easier? Here are a couple of tips:

Many people have a tendency to tighten their cheeks when they're holding the floss, which makes it more difficult to get their fingers into their mouths and working effectively. If you can relax your facial muscles while you're flossing, you'll have an easier time.

To help manipulate the floss more comfortably, try the “ring of floss” method: Securely tie the floss in a circle big enough to easily accommodate the fingers of one hand. To clean the upper teeth, place fingers inside the loop, and let the thumb and index finger guide the floss around each tooth. For the lower teeth, use two index fingers. Keep moving the floss in your hand so you always have a clean edge... and remember, the goal is to get the tooth clean, but it shouldn't hurt — so don't use too much pressure or go too fast.

So take a tip from Mrs. Brady: Don't forget the floss! If you would like more information about flossing and other oral hygiene techniques, please contact us for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flossing: A Different Approach.”


By C. Scott Davenport, D.D.S., PA
August 01, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DentalImplantSurgeryisaRoutineWorry-FreeProcedure

Dental implantation is the premier option for tooth replacement available today. While acquiring dental implants does involve a surgical procedure, don’t let that deter you — with proper preparation the procedure is relatively minor and routine.

Implants are root replacements inserted directly into the jawbone to which a life-like, artificial crown is secured (strategically placed implants can also support fixed bridges or removable dentures). They’re typically made of titanium, which is osseophilic or “bone-loving”: bone will grow and adhere to the implant over a few weeks time.

Pre-planning can help minimize discomfort during and after the implantation procedure. We first conduct a radiographic examination of the site with x-rays or CT imaging; this enables us to assess the site’s bone quality and quantity. We can also create a surgical guide from the imaging to pinpoint the precise location for an implant to ensure a successful outcome.

Before beginning the procedure, we numb the area with a local anesthesia (we can also administer a sedative or other relaxation medication if you’re experiencing mild apprehension). The procedure often begins by creating a flap opening in the gum tissue with a few small incisions to access the bone. Using the surgical guide, we then begin a drilling sequence into the bone that progressively increases the size of the hole until it precisely matches the size and shape of the implant.

When the site preparation is complete, we remove the implant from its sterile packaging (which minimizes the chance of infection) and immediately insert it into the prepared site. We verify proper positioning with more x-rays and then suture the flap opening of the gum tissue back into place.

Thanks to both the pre-planning and care taken during surgery, you should only experience minimal discomfort. While narcotic pain relievers like codeine or hydrocodone may be prescribed, most often non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or ibuprofen are all that’s needed. We may also prescribe an anti-bacterial mouthrinse (with chlorhexidine) to assist healing.

In just a few weeks your custom-made restorations will be attached to the implants. It’s the completion of a long but not difficult journey; the resulting smile transformation, though, can last for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”